Tag Archives: inspiring

Jen Tong

Illustrations by Jen Tong.

{via curiosities and clockwork}

Wang Aiying

Paintings by Wang Aiying, done using rice paper.

{via Beautiful/Decay}

John Canemaker

Watercolors by  John Canemaker. This blog has always been an archive of artists that inspire me, and I could never complete such a list without including John Canemaker. He is a personal hero of mine, and I am forever indebted to him for such genuine inspiration. Go read his books! Watch his films! (And if you go to NYU – absolutely take his classes)

{via Michael Sporn’s Splog - many more paintings to be found!}

Bianca Passarge

“Seventeen-year-old Bianca Passarge of Hamburg dresses up as a cat and dances on wine bottles in June 1958. Her performance was based on a dream. She practiced for eight hours a day to do this. So we’re told.”

{Photo by Carlo Polito - via Fieldguided}

Mattias Adolfsson: Part 2

More drawings from Mattias Adolfsson. His website is entirely inspiring, and I’m guessing that if you’re in artistic rut, he’ll help get you out of it. He does not stick with any single subject matter; he draws silverware, monsters, architecture, boats, fishing lures, anything, and he makes even the mundane look fresh and exciting.

Drawings from his sketchbooks after the jump

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Mattias Adolfsson: Part 1

I attempted to fit Mattias Adolfsson‘s work into a single post, but he is far too prolific. The images above (also continued after the jump) are all from sketchbooks. And if you’re thinking what I’m thinking (“I need to see these drawings in person!”) then you’re in luck! Adolfsson has just published a book, and you can find it here. Orders before June 1st will be signed, so hurry!

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Luigi Serafini

Images from Codex Seraphinianus, written and illustrated by Luigi Serafini in the 1970s. The book is a heavily illustrated encyclopedia of an unknown world. The text is beautiful yet incomprehensible (it has stumped linguists for decades.)  “Serafini has stated that there is no meaning hidden behind the script of the Codex, which is asemic; that his own experience in writing it was closely similar to automatic writing; and that what he wanted his alphabet to convey to the ‘reader’ is the sensation that children feel in front of books they cannot yet understand, although they see that their writing does make sense for grown-ups.”

More images are posted after the jump! And for even more click the link above – the entire book is published online, and it is definitely worth the time!

{forever indebted to magpie and whiskeyjack for posting about this beautiful book!}

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