India’s Root Bridges

I’m basically lifting this post from a slightly warped curiosities article so I’m not going to try to rewrite this text:

In Northeastern India, where it’s nice and wet, bridges aren’t built — they’re grown!  The living bridges of Cherrapunji, India are made from the roots of the Ficus elastica tree. This tree produces a series of secondary roots from higher up its trunk and can comfortably perch atop huge boulders along the riverbanks, or even in the middle of the rivers themselves.  In order to make a rubber tree’s roots grow in the right direction – say, over a river – the Khasis, a tribe in Meghalaya, use betel nut trunks, sliced down the middle and hollowed out, to create root-guidance systems. The thin, tender roots of the rubber tree, prevented from fanning out by the betel nut trunks, grow straight out. When they reach the other side of the river, they’re allowed to take root in the soil. Given enough time, a sturdy, living bridge is produced.


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2 responses to “India’s Root Bridges

  1. I’ve shown so many people these pictures since you posted this.

  2. Let’s make one.
    -Kelsey

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